Friday, December 16, 2005

That's What They Get For Stealing Our Team

First they took our team. Now they're taking our ex-third basemen. Tony Batista, fresh from being released by a team in Japan, despite giving a typically Bastistian performance, has been signed by the Minnesota Twins. He's presumably the front-runner for their third base job, and the most prominent of the Twins Bloggers definitely isn't happy. Check out Gleeman's deconstruction of Mr. Batista.

9 Comments:

  • Wow, Gleeman really crapped that waffle right out of the park . . .

    Batista used 494 OUTS in 2004????!!!!

    I know a horrid OBP + lots and lots of PT will do that, and I've seen Batista make more than his share of outs, but that's still almost unfathomable to me.

    By Blogger Basil, at 12/16/2005 11:55 AM  

  • What? That's only 18 games worth of outs! Just trifles!

    By Blogger Chris Needham, at 12/16/2005 11:57 AM  

  • I think now would be an ideal time to point out that Batista is COMPARABLE to Alf.

    By Blogger Nate, at 12/16/2005 1:40 PM  

  • If he were, yes, it would be a great time to do so. But the two players, while you might say "stylistically similar," really aren't comparable players.

    By Blogger Basil, at 12/16/2005 2:10 PM  

  • Gleeman needs to settle down. If this is the worst thing the Twins have ever done, they're a damn well-run team.

    By Blogger Ryan, at 12/16/2005 2:42 PM  

  • Oh, I don't know... Soriano's certainly faster than Tony, which helps with the OBP and staying out of GIDPs. But if you were looking to build an infield around good pop, no discipline, no glove hitters, you'd really have to have both of them. Equivalent? No. Comparable? Hmmm...

    By Blogger Nate, at 12/16/2005 3:08 PM  

  • Soriano's most similar players through age 29, from Baseball Reference:

    1. Joe Gordon
    2. Howard Johnson
    3. Ken Boyer
    4. Richard Hidalgo
    5. TONY BATISTA
    6. Jose Vidro (interestingly enough)
    7. Larry Walker (!!)
    8. Jim Ray Hart (I don't know who that is either)
    9. Jeff Kent
    10. Geoff Jenkins

    That's a kind of odd group, which doesn't really prove anything other than the fact that similarity scores are mostly just a party game. Still, TBat is on the list, so I thought I'd throw some fuel on the fire.

    By Blogger Randolph, at 12/16/2005 3:12 PM  

  • Equivalent? No. Comparable? Hmmm...

    Well, okay. I guess.

    Re: the similarity score difference, I'd note (along with Randolph's disclaimer that the method is of uneven value):

    1) One guy has a 111 career OPS+ and the other guy is at 95; one guy's created 5.62 RC/27 and the other guy is at 4.63; and so forth; and,

    2) That similarity score is Soriano's No. 5 "through age 29," which is to say through Batista's 2002 season---which is precisely the point I'd make in saying they are not really comparable at all, because Batista in 2003-04 isn't comparable to Batista in, say, '98-00.

    In other words, Batista's early years, when he WAS comparable to Soriano, influence his career similarity score.

    Now, if you can tell me that Soriano will go around getting on base 27.2 % of the time or will somehow slug only .393 despite hitting 26 homers because he batted only .235 or hit an unfathomably low 20 doubles in 631 ABs, or anything like that, I'd be more on board.

    I guess I'm hard to convince on this one.

    By Blogger Basil, at 12/16/2005 3:29 PM  

  • Now, if you can tell me that Soriano will go around getting on base 27.2 % of the time or will somehow slug only .393 despite hitting 26 homers because he batted only .235 or hit an unfathomably low 20 doubles in 631 ABs, or anything like that, I'd be more on board.

    Well, we'll just have to revisit this projection in August...

    By Blogger Yuda, at 12/17/2005 3:22 AM  

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