Wednesday, March 16, 2005

Ouch! Mi Rodilla Y Codo!

Jose Vidro missed another game yesterday with a wonky (Not a scientific term) elbow. It doesn’t appear to be a big deal, but he’s had very few at-bats this spring, because he’s been resting his surgically repaired knee. It may be a little while before he can get his timing down.

But, this hits on a larger issue. For whatever reason, second basemen have proven to be the least durable of the position players. There are hundreds of second basemen who’ve fallen off the cliff offensively or missed significant amounts of time due to injury after turning 30, which Vidro’s about to hit. His similar batter’s list includes players like Mike Lansing, Whitey Kurowski and Gil McDougald who put up solid numbers as 25-year olds, but were done by the time they turned 30.

Vidro’s a better hitter than any of them were, so even if he slips, he’ll still be useful. But the trend with second basemen is an ominous one, especially with his contract. He might be an expensive oft-injured pine-rider by the end.

3 Comments:

  • And don't forget Roberto Alomar, the rich man's Vidro. I still can't believe what happened to that guy.

    By Blogger Ryan, at 3/16/2005 12:22 PM  

  • Alomar decided a HoF career path was all too boring and desired to pull a Carlos Baerga late in his career.

    And I was about to say that McDougald might not be a great comp, because wasn't his career abruptly ended by being hit with the ball? Then I remember that, no, he was the one that did the hitting (via a batted ball). The recipient was Herb Score.

    By Blogger Basil, at 3/16/2005 9:57 PM  

  • Damn, the Mcdougald story is even better! (And maybe not the best example to use in this case)

    At age 33, though he may have had several good years left, he retired rather than join the Washington Senators, who selected him in the 1961 expansion draft.

    By Blogger Chris Needham, at 3/16/2005 10:04 PM  

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